2605 Blue Ridge Road, Suite 100 Raleigh, NC 27607(919) 881-9009

Carolina Kids Blog

Posts for tag: breastfeeding

By Carolina Kids Pediatrics
July 08, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: breastfeeding  

How Your Pediatricians in Raleigh, NC, Can Help You 


At Carolina Kids Pediatrics, we do what we can to support families as they navigate all the challenges that come with infant feeding – breastfeedingbreast, bottle, or both. The American Academy of Pediatrics policy on breastfeeding recommends:

“Exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” 

We fully support this recommendation, but we also recognize that for many families, it isn’t that easy. There are many challenges to successful breastfeeding, including difficulties with infant latching, flat/inverted nipples, infant tongue tie, breast infections, low milk supply, engorgement, and many other competing demands on a new mom.

Fortunately, it's not a path you have to navigate alone — your pediatricians and our lactation consultant here at Carolina Kids Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC are here to support you every step of the way. We recognize that while breastmilk provides ideal nutrition for babies, breastfeeding is not right for all families – and we are here to help your baby and your family thrive, whether you decide to breastfeed or formula fee. Our lactation consultant, Jerrianne Webb, is in our office weekly to provide extended lactation consultation appointments for families, and she is available to provide free telephone support at other times also.

For most families, I see three phases of learning to breastfeed which I call “learning to latch”, “learning to eat”, and “learning the routine.”

Learning to latch: Newborns are designed to require very little milk – breast or formula – in the first few days of life. In the first 24 hours of life, the focus should usually be on proper latch at the breast, not on how much milk a baby is getting. Your baby’s lips should be flanged wide apart, and the nipple of the breast should be in the back of their mouth, not between their lips. If it hurts or pinches through the feeding, the latch is probably wrong and needs to be corrected. Gently open your baby’s mouth wide and support their head in very close to the breast to achieve a proper latch. During this time, a brief 5 minute feed with a good latch is better than a 20 minute feed with a poor latch. Putting your baby to breast as early as possible after delivery, at least 10-12 times daily, and correcting a narrow, biting latch whenever possible can help increase your chance of success.

Learning to eat: Your milk comes in three or four days after delivery. Now, your breast feels full before the feeding, and hopefully softens after the feeding. Your baby will eat 15-30 minutes per side instead of the brief feedings of the first few days. If your baby has learned how to latch well in the first few days, she should be more content after the feeding, continue to eat every 2-3 hours on average, and start to have more frequent wet diapers and lighter yellow or brown stools. She should stop losing weight and start to gain 1/2 to 1 ounce daily.

Learning the routine: As your baby grows, you may choose to start introducing bottles of pumped breastmilk to get some breaks in your day and to allow family members to feed your baby. Ideally, your baby has learned to latch and nurse well first. A slow-flow bottle, like an Avent bottle, might be less confusing for your breastfeeding baby. Brief pumping after nursing several times daily will provide you the milk you need to supplement. You can freeze breastmilk for months, then thaw it in warm water – don’t microwave breastmilk to warm it. 

The list of advantages from breastfeeding for your baby may include reduction in  the risks of:

1. Infectious diseases such as ear infections, gastroenteritis, and pneumonia
2. Eczema and asthma
3. Obesity
4. Diabetes
5. Sudden infant death syndrome
6. Overall infant mortality
 
Mothers who breastfeed their infants also receive health benefits, significantly reducing their own risk of developing:

1. Type 2 diabetes
2. High blood pressure
3. Ovarian cancer
4. Breast cancer
 
Questions? Give Us a Call

To learn more, call your pediatricians or lactation consultant at Carolina Kids Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC, at (919) 881-9009, or send us a message through the patient portal!

By Carolina Kids Pediatrics
January 26, 2018
Category: Children's Health
Tags: breastfeeding  

Should a mother continue to breastfeed if she has been exposed to influenza?

What if she has tested positive for the flu, or has other children that have it? Should she temporarily wean the baby to protect him? breastfeeding

These questions have been frequently asked by many mothers of breastfeeding newborns over the last few weeks. As the lactation consultant at Carolina Kids Pediatrics in Raleigh, NC, I have been asked these questions several times in the last few days alone.

Breastfeeding mothers SHOULD continue to breastfeed even if they have influenza, or have been exposed to it. Breastfeeding protects the newborn from infections, as antibodies from the mother’s body are passed to the newborn through the milk. The flu virus, as with any virus, has an incubation period. This is the time before the onset of symptoms. Since breastfeeding mothers and babies share the same environment, the mother and baby are likely exposed to the virus at the same time. During this incubation period, the mother’s body begins to produce these protective antibodies for the baby. Breastfeeding (and handwashing!) is the best protection for the newborn.

In the case where a mother is receiving anti-viral medications, such as Tamiflu, breastfeeding is still not contraindicated.  The mother should continue to breastfeed as desired.

Please do not hesitate to contact your pediatrician in Raleigh, NC, to discuss any concerns you have about flu symptoms, or breastfeeding.

You may call Carolina Kids Pediatrics at (919) 881-9009 to schedule an appointment with me. I’ll be glad to help with any of your breastfeeding concerns. 
Jerrianne Webb, RN, IBCLC
 
For more information:
https://ibconline.ca/maternal-illness1



Back
to
Top